Robert Triggs wrote:

While remote SIM provisioning and a tiny secure chip are supposed to solve these problems, there’s still the issue of practicality. Checking and comparing data plans is easy enough online, but there’s currently not a good way to apply said plans quickly to your eSIM. Customers often have to pop into stores or buy eSIM packs, scan QR codes and mess around in settings menus. This is arguably more inconvenient than ordering a standard SIM.

Having used an e-sim for more or less a year I can confirm its more hassle than it really should be. The real beauty of a standard sim is you can transfer it it seconds.

When I set up my iPhone 11 I had to pay £1.50 because I had already transferred it into an iPhone XS Max a few months before. Staff  in carrier stores are still unknowledgeable and I don’t feel it is a problem that needs ‘solving’.

There is a benefit to traveling, but it is not so much of a pain to buy a local sim that everything needs to built into the phone.